Category Archives: Uncategorized

Tom Sietsema Says Salt Line Is a Beaut

What the critics are saying this week

Salt Line

Washington Post restaurant critic Tom Sietsema gives Long Shot Hospitality’s nascent New England-themed seafood stop across from Nationals Park a first bite and thinks chef Kyle Bailey knocks it out of the park. “Restaurants with postcard vistas, outdoor patios and serious drinks don’t come along every day, and this one is a beaut.” Oysters are aplenty; some rare ones include Rochambeau from Virginia, and Moonrise from Rhode Island. Nashville hot soft-shell crab with griddled white bread, pickled green tomatoes, and black-garlic honey is “delish,” while uni is the star in a pleasing portion of bucatini. Other best bets include onion rings and French fries made in-house. Bust out the Instagram app for the fluffernutter milkshake (a “boardwalk fantasy”), but skip the trout almondine, and fried clam bellies with too much breading. [WaPo]


Nasime

Sietsema gives the tiny 20-seat Japanese restaurant in the heart of Old Town Alexandria 2.5 stars, or good/excellent. He raves over chef-owner Yuh Shimomura (n alum of Kaz Sushi Bistro and Sei in Washington) and his daily-changing tasting menu (five courses for $48). He “typically shops at two or three markets a day for his evening performances,” notes Sietsema. One night, the “Tokyo-style tuna tartare” was garnished with crisp asparagus and displayed on a green floor tile with upturned edges. Expect sashimi to include a bounty of colors and flavors. Good luck snagging a seat at the slim spot, Sietsema warns. [WaPo]


Gus’s Fried Chicken

WaPo’s Tim Carman ventures over to Gus’s Fried Chicken in Greenbelt, Md., and he instantly feels at home at the Tennessee-based chain, equating the experience to a backyard social where employees feel like neighbors. As for the food, the main event features “unfailingly moist” chicken and crisp skin that’s fried in peanut oil (he notes there are no substitutions for allergies). The sides are sweet, which is a tactic to balance the hot chicken. He’s not sold, though, and thinks nothing will satisfy like the chicken. Those interested in road-testing the place for themselves are encouraged to go with the greaseless fried okra or the fried pickles, he says. “Paired with a Natty Boh tallboy, it’s fried-on-fried on fantastic.” [WaPo]


La Fromagerie

Northern Virginia Magazine’s Stefanie Gans thinks it’s “easy to find charm” at this neighborhood restaurant in Alexandria. Take the “lovely” pappardelle dish, made fresh with wheat berries ground into flour. There’s also a “sumptuous cut” of lamb, cooked sous vide. French wine is flowing with some unusual biodynamic varieties. There’s usually a dark chocolate pot de creme on the menu, which she describes as better than mousse or pudding. “It’s simple and striking, like most everything else here.”


FROM THE BLOGS: BYT gives Shaw newcomer Capo Deli a first look, while Bitches Who Brunch head to Community in Bethesda, Been There, Eaten That heads to Silver, and Hungry Lobbyist eats at Cuba Libre.

What two generations of Castellucci restaurateurs learned from their dads

“This was my grandfather’s restaurant in Rhode Island,” says Federico W. Castellucci III. “He’s the guy behind the counter with the big handlebar mustache that I could never get right for myself. He looked awesome with it.”Photograph courtesy of Federico W. Castellucci III The Castellucci family has been in the restaurant business for 100 years now. Federico “Mr. C” Castellucci II, the patriarch of Castellucci Hospitality Group (Cooks & Soldiers, Double Zero, Sugo and the Iberian Pig), descends from an Italian father and a Greek mother whose families both immigrated to America. The picture above was taken in Rhode Island in 1917. “At the front left corner behind the counter is my grandfather, Achilles Zavolangos,” says Castellucci, of the Greek side of his family. “In…View Original Post

New York Ice Cream, Ranked for Summer

Ryan Sutton weighs in on best flavors for dog days

Artisanal ice cream — or whatever you call the product that costs $9 or more a pint — is too much. Too much cream. Too much sugar. Too many eggs. Too much stuff in it — from butter cake to birthday cake, to peanut butter cups. This is true in the winter but even more true in the summer: a conclusion I came to following a sampling of at least 14 different ice creams at the Eater offices in Lower Manhattan. By the time it was over, I sat slumped in a chair, my stomach leaden with dairy fat.

A colleague from Polygon, Vox Media’s video game vertical, swung by and dipped her spoon into a few pints. She frowned. I remarked that these ice creams didn’t feel summery, and she replied that “it’s kind of a bummer when ice cream makes you want to drink an entire bottle of water.”

Summer ice cream means being able to eat more ice cream without going into a food coma. Maybe that means sacrificing a little depth of flavor, and maybe that means passing on the hand-spun pistachio ice cream with the texture of fancy nut butter and instead opt for the pale green stuff pumped out of a machine, heady with artificial extract.

And that’s okay, because sometimes the best summer ice cream is the edible equivalent of a wine cooler — something slightly sweet that you can keep consuming without too many ill-effects. If you want something a bit more decadent, well then gelato, with its dense and often custard-free base, will do brilliantly.

New York Ice Cream, Ranked for Summer
New York Ice Cream, Ranked for Summer

The following list isn’t meant to be comprehensive; it’s a collection of desserts I find both satiating and refreshing (if I wanted only refreshing I’d have sorbet or water ice). I did not go out of my way to explore new ice cream shops because summer ice cream shouldn’t require a hot trip on the subway. Summer ice cream should draw you across the street or perhaps a block or two out of your way. I mention this to mentally prepare you for why McDonald’s and Milk Bar beat out your overpriced Brooklyn ice cream shop. Enjoy.

The Two Best Summer Ice Creams

1. Grom’s yogurt gelato: Packs such a brilliant balance of electric tanginess and restrained sugars that the tongue vibrates as it does with a perfect Spatlese Riesling. And while the treat packs more pucker than commercially-strained greek yogurt, its texture never approaches the density of that product. It is that rare frozen dairy treat that is simultaneously refreshing yet complex. Pair it as a milky analogue to apricot sorbet and there’s your summer evening right there.

2. Milk Bar Cereal Milk soft serve: So ubiquitous that describing it would be like explaining a McDonald’s hamburger. But for the record: This is a mildly-dense soft serve infused with the flavor of corn flakes. I’ve occasionally criticized Christina Tosi’s elevated junk food for employing levels of sugar that make you wonder if anything is elevated and whether it’s really just junk food, but this soft serve is decidedly savory, with distinct notes of salt and caramelized bran. If that sounds too intense, the flavor disappears as quickly as an artificial water ice. And so you continue to eat.

New York Ice Cream, Ranked for Summer
New York Ice Cream, Ranked for Summer
New York Ice Cream, Ranked for Summer
New York Ice Cream, Ranked for Summer

The Rest

3. Il Laboratorio del Gelato Rose: Walk inside the giant commissary on Ludlow Street and the first thing you notice is the temperature: It’s air conditioned like a meat locker. Simply being here will cool you off. And while the 300 plus flavors rotate on a regular basis, Il Laboratorio is one of the few institutions I know of to currently offer the edible perfume that is rose gelato. Like most gelati here, the rose is egg free. The texture is dense and smooth, with no ice (not something that can be said of all the offerings here, alas), and a floral aroma that is distinct but never overpowering. I wish more New York ice cream shops consistently highlighted herbal ice creams like this, laced with orange flower, lavender, and perhaps jasmine.

4. Superiority Burger: Brooks Headley, the ex-Del Posto pastry chef, dropped egg from his gelato base a few months ago, and the resulting current product barely has more weight on the tongue than low-fat cottage cheese. It’s really something else: you can eat a fully-loaded veggie burger, finish off with a cup of salted caramel gelato, and you feel energized.

5. McDonald’s Soft Serve: Milk, sugar, cream, and enough cellulose gum and guar gum to ensure that your cone won’t drip while you savor your entrees. Don’t expect depth of flavor or heady vanilla accents here: McDonald’s soft serve essentially serves as an affordable delivery mechanism for cool deliciousness in an air conditioned space with dodgy wifi. Keep in mind that the chain’s soft-serve machines tend to break down occasionally. Worst case scenario, that might be a Chick-fil-A nearby, but maybe read my review before you go?

6. Shake Shack Float: Shake Shack’s frozen custard soft serve is on the rich side for hot weather consumption, but if you insist on an eggy experience during a heatwave, allow me to recommend the root beer, or even better, purple cow floats, which take advantage of soda’s carbonic power to temper the lusciousness of custard. Note that if you’re here just for sweets, there’s often a separate, faster line.

7. Van Leeuwen Mint: Just one of two egg and cream-heavy selections on this list and the only chocolate-chip entrant. Van Leeuwen uses a strong, sharp peppermint oil that keeps the voluptuous custard from going overboard. And the chocolate chips are more finely ground and judiciously used than elsewhere. The single variety cocoa accents the dessert without overpowering it with tongue-drying tannins.

8. Morgenstern’s Raw Milk: Light, tangy, maybe even a touch funky, depending on the batch: Now don’t get me wrong I don’t actually recommend you drop by Morgenstern’s, where there will likely be a 45 minute-long line (and just a single cashier) but if you live in New York it’s entirely likely an obnoxious friend will insist on going here (omg it’s the best). So if you get dragged here, get the raw milk.

Treat dad to these OTP specials for Father’s Day

Ray’s on the River and Ray’s at Killer Creek are hosting brunch buffets with everything from seafood and salad bars to carving stations, desserts and more./Photo credit: Ray’s Restaurants

No matter if your dad is a beast in the kitchen (hello grill master!) or the king of take-out—treat him to a little something extra this Sunday, June 18, for Father’s Day and take him out for a nice meal and quality time with his nearest and dearest. A variety of OTP restaurants are cooking up special dishes and menus meant to show dads the love on Sunday, one bite at a time. Here are a few spots to put on your radar:

Treat dad to these OTP specials for Father’s Day

Barleygarden Kitchen & Craft bar is offering the “Big Papa” Share Plate this Sunday—a prix fixe menu of small bites will be offered alongside a beer flight./ Photo credit: Brilliance Photography

Barleygarden Kitchen & Craft Bar
Bring your dad to Avalon’s recently opened Barleygarden Kitchen & Craft Bar for the The “Big Papa” Share Plate this Sunday. A prix fixe menu of small bites will be offered alongside a beer flight—all for only $35. Bites include one brat slider, Big NY slider, veggie slider and one “The Best Hot Dog You’ll Ever Eat” in addition to tastes of Cauliflower Fries, Golden Frites, Garden Tots and Pretzel Bites, plus four 4 oz. beer tastes of dad’s choice. T sampler serves one to four people—so come extra hungry!
900 Avalon Blvd., Alpharetta. 678-266-6218. barleygardenkitchen.com.

Treat dad to these OTP specials for Father’s Day

Osteria Mattone is serving a Father’s Day special of bone-in ribeye with truffled polenta./ Photo credit: Ryan Pernice

Osteria Mattone and Table & Main
In downtown historic Roswell, local favorites from R.O. Hospitality—Table & Main and Osteria Mattone are both offering special menu items for meat-loving dads. At Table & Main, dad can nosh on a Southern meal of Big Green Egg-smoked split bone ribeye that comes with madeira and veal stock-glazed mushrooms and creamed Georgia greens casserole (market price). Up the street at Osteria Mattone, try the bone-in ribeye with truffled polenta and badna cauda for $40.
Table & Main, 1028 Canton Street, Roswell. 678-896- 5178. tableandmain.com.
Osteria Mattone, 1095 Canton Street, Roswell.  678-878-3378. osteriamattone.com.

Treat dad to these OTP specials for Father’s Day

Milton’s Cuisine & Cocktails is offering a special prix fixe Father’s Day brunch. including sticky toffee pecan beignets (shown here)./ Photo credit: Heidi Geldhauser

Milton’s Cuisine & Cocktails
Celebrate Father’s Day in downtown Crabapple at Milton’s Cuisine & Cocktails, which is offering a special prix fixe Father’s Day brunch and specials that pair with High West bourbon. Enticing offerings include sticky toffee pecan beignets, shrimp and grits, blackened Atlantic salmon, a truffle-salted petite filet mignon and maple bacon bread pudding—all for $32 per person. Milton’s is also serving its regular menu, including Milton’s Prime, a selection of prime steaks.
800 Mayfield Road, Milton. 770-817-0161. miltonscuisine.com.

The Big Ketch Saltwater Grill
Ride the beach vibes at the Roswell location of The Big Ketch Saltwater Grill, serving up a mega seafood feast for ocean-loving dads. The special Father’s Day offering features a crab cake, lobster tail, a skewer of shrimp or scallops (grilled, blackened or jerk style) with two sides for $34.95.
1105 Canton Street, Roswell. thebigketch.com.

Ray’s on the River and Ray’s at Killer Creek are hosting brunch buffets with everything from seafood and salad bars to carving stations, desserts and more./Photo credit: Ray’s Restaurants

Ray’s Restaurants
If brunch is a must, consider the smorgasbord that is the brunch buffet at Ray’s Restaurants. Enjoy views of the Chattahoochee at Ray’s on the River in Sandy Springs while filling up on eats from several carving stations, seafood and salad bars, morning and afternoon/evening options and desserts ($45.95 for adults, $22.95 for kids ages 5 to 10) from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. Or head to Ray’s at Killer Creek in Alpharetta for options like peel-and-eat shrimp, rosemary-roasted leg of lamb and roasted prime rib ($39.95 for adults, $19.95 for kids 5 to 10) from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Ray’s on the River, 6700 Powers Ferry Road. NW, Sandy Springs. 770-955-1187; Ray’s at Killer Creek, 1700 Mansell Road, Alpharetta. 770-649-0064; raysrestaurants.com.

Treat dad to these OTP specials for Father’s Day

C&S Chowder House bar area./ Photo credit- Mia Yakel.

C&S Chowder House and Hugo’s Oyster Bar
In Roswell, both C&S Chowder House and Hugo’s Oyster Bar will be opening early for brunch at 10 a.m., with a Bloody Mary bar available at both restaurants. On the menu at Hugo’s, dad can order up a special of grilled hanger steak with a skewer of grilled shrimp that comes with malanga puree, chimichurri sauce and a side house salad ($30). At C&S Chowder House, a special Dads Surf n’ Turf will be served, featuring an 8-oz. filet mignon, potatoes and asparagus, and choice of house or Caesar salad ($32), with the option to add a shrimp skewer ($8), lobster tail ($18) or a half pound of Alaskan king crab ($28).
C&S Chowder House, 12040 Etris Road, Roswell. 470-321-5077. candschowderhouse.com
Hugo’s Oyster Bar,
10360 Alpharetta Street, Roswell. 770-993-5922. hugosoysterbar.com.

 

Treat dad to these OTP specials for Father’s Day

Fruity Waffle with blueberries, strawberries, bananas, and powdered sugar at Metro Diner./ Photo credit- Mia Yakel.

Metro Diner
Does dad love a good diner? Consider checking out the Roswell location of Metro Diner, whose Charleston shrimp and grits and meatloaf were featured on Food Network’s “Diner’s, Drive-In, and Dives.” Head to the diner, which is now serving beer, wine and mimosas, and kick back on their covered patio to enjoy a home cooked feast diner-style. You can try their fried chicken and waffles topped with house-made strawberry butter and a sweet and spicy sauce or one of several menu specials being offered on Sunday, to include: seafood frittata, cinnamon roll pancake, country fried steak breakfast and more. Most dishes are priced under $15.
880 Holcomb Bridge Road, Ate. 100, Roswell. 678-539-0879. metrodiner.com.

The Ritz-Carlton Reynolds, Lake Oconee
Sure it might be a bit an hour and a half from Atlanta, but if you really want to indulge dad this Sunday, consider heading to The Ritz-Carlton Reynolds, Lake Oconee for their Big Father’s Day Cookout from 5 p.m.-8 p.m. The special cookout will feature regional guest chefs cooking up some of their favorite dishes for dad, along with offerings from local eatery Copperwood Pizza. Chef’s participating in the cookout include Chef Brandon Carter of FARM Bluffton in Bluffton, S.C.; Chef David Carrier of Certified Burgers and Beverage in St. Simons Island; and Chef Casey Burchfield of Linger Longer Steakhouse at The Ritz-Carlton Reynolds, Lake Oconee. You can also enjoy live music, a kid’s activity corner, beer and wine, plus a concert from Nashville artist Jason Eskridge as part of the resort’s Lake Summer Concert Series in The Backyard, followed by a fireworks display. The evening is priced at $58 per adult, $29 per child (ages 4-12) and children under 3 are free.
1 Lake Oconee Trail, Greensboro. 706-467-0600. ritzcarlton.com/en/hotels/georgia/Reynolds.

Related

Where to dine on Father’s Day in Atlanta

Don’t get Dad another tie, get him a drink

Explore where to eat in Atlanta with the AJC’s Spring Dining Guide

Read more stories like this by liking Atlanta Restaurant Scene on Facebook, following @ATLDiningNews on Twitter and @ajcdining on Instagram.

 

Treat dad to these OTP specials for Father’s Day

Dunkel Dare Returns to Frankford Hall Next Week

Frankford Hall/Facebook

Nineties kids, rejoice: Dunkel Dare, a collaboration between beloved Double Dare host and area native Marc Summers, Philly brewers, and Frankford Hall, is back in all its messy, boozy glory on June 21st and 22nd.

Frankford Hall, which has hosted Summers and his slime-soaked games in the past, will be transformed into a messy, fun-filled “Slopstacle Course,” lovingly recreated with the help of The Franklin Institute. (If you don’t know what Double Dare is, stop reading this and go Snapchat a fidget spinner or something. If you want a refresher that will no doubt bring back tender childhood memories, check out this excellent oral history of the show.)

Four teams, each made up of brewmasters (from Yards, Victory, Troeg’s, and Paulaner), local celebs, and a lucky guest from the crowd, will take on pop culture and beer trivia and physical challenges posed by Summers in the competition.

And one lucky Frankford Hall guest each night will have the chance to win a spot in the Slime Zone — that is, a front-row seat — for the competition for themselves and seven friends: leading up to the event, the beer hall will display Double Dare’s iconic nose prop, the giant schnozz that countless kids fished around in for flags covered in green goop back in the day. Take a selfie with the nose and post it to social media with the hashtag #slimeme to enter the contest. In addition to VIP access to the front row, the winner will be moved to the front of the line, have a personal server assist for the evening, and get a free poncho.

The first two rounds will take place on June 21st, with the championship final round on June 22nd. Doors open at 4 p.m., with games starting at 7 p.m. and going until 11 p.m. There’s a $5 cover (food and drink is pay-as-you-go) and entry is first come, first served, so get there early if you want to be a part of the fun.

Dunkel Dare [Facebook]

The post Dunkel Dare Returns to Frankford Hall Next Week appeared first on Philadelphia Magazine.

RECAP: Last Night’s Taste of Home Benefit at Housing Works

Housing Works hosted its annual culinary benefit Taste of Home last night, and I was able to pop in for a bit to check it out! A little after I arrived New York Times Food Editor Sam Sifton announced raffle winners while guests munched on offerings from some of NYC’s best chefs and restaurants. 100% of the proceeds from the event will benefit Housing Works’ lifesaving services for people living with HIV/AIDS in New York City and their political advocacy work to end AIDS as an epidemic in New York State by 2020, in the United States by 2025, and worldwide by 2030. Good food, good people, good cause…you can’t go wrong! Here are some visuals:

RECAP: Last Night’s Taste of Home Benefit at Housing WorksRECAP: Last Night’s Taste of Home Benefit at Housing Works RECAP: Last Night’s Taste of Home Benefit at Housing WorksRECAP: Last Night’s Taste of Home Benefit at Housing WorksRECAP: Last Night’s Taste of Home Benefit at Housing WorksRECAP: Last Night’s Taste of Home Benefit at Housing WorksRECAP: Last Night’s Taste of Home Benefit at Housing WorksRECAP: Last Night’s Taste of Home Benefit at Housing WorksRECAP: Last Night’s Taste of Home Benefit at Housing Works

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Vetri’s Great Chefs Event Returns to the Navy Yard

Photo courtesy of Great Chefs Event

Marc Vetri’s Great Chefs Event, which brings the nation and region’s hottest chefs together for a night of curated food and drink benefiting the nonprofit Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation and Vetri Community Partnership, is back for its 12th year on Tuesday, June 20th.

Taking place in the Urban Outfitters corporate campus at the Navy Yard, this year’s event boasts more than 40 luminaries of the food and drink world from across the country, with culinary stars like Hugh Acheson, Ryan Poli, and Alex Guarnaschelli serving up bites.

Local heroes include brewers like Yards’ Tom Kehoe, Victory Brewing’s Bill Covaleski, Tom Peters of Monk’s Cafe, and Carol Stoudt of Stoudt’s Brewing Company as well as 2017 James Beard Award-winning chefs like Mike Solomonov and Greg Vernick.

The festivities also include a silent auction and, following the main event, an after party at Lo Spiedo, with chefs like Solomonov and Jose Garces rubbing elbows with guests and entertainment provided by Philly rapper Schoolly D.

Vetri and business partner Jeff Benjamin’s philanthropic efforts started in 2006, when they held a dinner at The Restaurant School featuring dishes from eight local chefs for 100 guests and raised $50,000 for the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation. And their efforts have grown exponentially: last year, the Great Chefs Event brought in $700,000 for both Alex’s Lemonade Stand and Vetri Community Partnership.

The main event starts at 6 p.m. on June 20th. General admission tickets go for $350 and After Party Access tickets for $525. You can get yours here.

Great Chefs Event [Foobooz]

The post Vetri’s Great Chefs Event Returns to the Navy Yard appeared first on Philadelphia Magazine.

Kevin Sbraga’s Last Restaurant Closes on Sunday

Kevin Sbraga/Facebook

Chef Kevin Sbraga’s last restaurant is folding: The Fat Ham at the King of Prussia Mall’s last day will be this Sunday, June 18th.

Speaking to Philly.com, Sbraga said that he believes the organization grew too big too quickly. Investors were eager to partner with him, despite his lack of management experience, and he opened five restaurants in under five years: fine dining spot Sbraga, two locations of hot chicken-focused The Fat Ham in University City and King of Prussia, the short-lived throwback Juniper Commons, and Jacksonville, Fl.-based Sbraga & Company.

After this final closure, Sbraga plans to consult or work for other chefs. But he expressed doubt that he would own a business again in the future unless he also owns the real estate as well.

On Sunday from 12 p.m. until 3 p.m., guests can get one last taste of The Fat Ham’s hot chicken for half price.

Kevin Sbraga [Foobooz]

The post Kevin Sbraga’s Last Restaurant Closes on Sunday appeared first on Philadelphia Magazine.

Kevin Sbraga’s Last Restaurant Closes on Sunday

Kevin Sbraga/Facebook

Chef Kevin Sbraga’s last restaurant is folding: The Fat Ham at the King of Prussia Mall’s last day will be this Sunday, June 18th.

Speaking to Philly.com, Sbraga said that he believes the organization grew too big too quickly. Investors were eager to partner with him, despite his lack of management experience, and he opened five restaurants in under five years: fine dining spot Sbraga, two locations of hot chicken-focused The Fat Ham in University City and King of Prussia, the short-lived throwback Juniper Commons, and Jacksonville, Fl.-based Sbraga & Company.

After this final closure, Sbraga plans to consult or work for other chefs. But he expressed doubt that he would own a business again in the future unless he also owns the real estate as well.

On Sunday from 12 p.m. until 3 p.m., guests can get one last taste of The Fat Ham’s hot chicken for half price.

Kevin Sbraga [Foobooz]

The post Kevin Sbraga’s Last Restaurant Closes on Sunday appeared first on Philadelphia Magazine.

No Breslin at the Ace on Bowery — and More Intel

Plus, Eric Werner from Hartwood in Tulum is coming to cook for New Yorkers

No Breslin sibling at the Bowery Ace

Another Ace Hotel shows signs of progress in the former Salvation Army location at 225 Bowery with Bowery Boogie pointing to “rooftop appendages” for the rooftop bar following the interior gutting: “Eventually, this new construction will look something like this.” Though the hotel will feature a 130-seat restaurant, last we checked, Ken Friedman and April Bloomfield are not setting up a restaurant in that location, despite that The Breslin and The John Dory anchor the NoMad’s Ace.

Tulum in New York

Exciting news for those who can’t afford to jet off to Tulum, as well as those who miss their vacation dinner at Hartwood: Eric Werner is cooking at Chefs Club (275 Mulberry Street) on June 22 and 23. The Peasant alum and master of open-fire cooking will prepare five Hartwood dishes for an à la carte menu. You can book through Open Table here.

Carretera Tulum Boca Paila

A post shared by Hartwood Tulum (@hartwoodtulum) on

Shoolbred’s is closing

EVGrieve reports that Shoolbred’s at 197 Second Avenue will close on Sunday after nearly ten years in the neighborhood because the rent’s too high. “It is appropriate that we should be closing on Father’s Day weekend,” co-owner Robert Morgan told the blog, “Shoolbred’s was designed as ‘Your Father’s Bar, while your father is away on business.'” Morgan also runs Kingston Hall on Second Avenue and Baci e Vendetta on Avenue A with Nic Ratner.

A Bronx Tale’s Chazz Palminteri moves his restaurant

The man who wrote and performed the Broadway show — now playing at the Longacre Theatre — also has a namesake restaurant that he’s moving from Second Avenue to 30 West 46th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues at the Cambria Hotel later this month. The restaurant has resided at its current location since 2015.

It’s herring season, don’t you know?

Grand Central Oyster Bar kicked off its Holland Herring Festival that runs through June 30, with an event earlier this week with the higher-ups from the Netherlands Consulate. The delicacy arrives air-expressed from Scheveningen, The Netherlands, on the North Sea where herring is caught. For the next two weeks, they’ll be served with hard-boiled egg, sweet onion, and chives, priced starting at $7.

Mark your calendar: Rosé soiree at Roberta’s

Next Sunday there’s a rosé soiree on Sunday, June 25 from noon to 6 p.m. Wine guy Hugh Crickmore will feature over thirty natural, organic, and biodynamic rosés from producers from around the world. And because no rose party is complete without a pig roast, there will be pork — along with pizzas available from the take-out bakery.

What does it take to raise a perfect oyster?

Find out here:

No Breslin at the Ace on Bowery — and More Intel

Plus, Eric Werner from Hartwood in Tulum is coming to cook for New Yorkers

No Breslin sibling at the Bowery Ace

Another Ace Hotel shows signs of progress in the former Salvation Army location at 225 Bowery with Bowery Boogie pointing to “rooftop appendages” for the rooftop bar following the interior gutting: “Eventually, this new construction will look something like this.” Though the hotel will feature a 130-seat restaurant, last we checked, Ken Friedman and April Bloomfield are not setting up a restaurant in that location, despite that The Breslin and The John Dory anchor the NoMad’s Ace.

Tulum in New York

Exciting news for those who can’t afford to jet off to Tulum, as well as those who miss their vacation dinner at Hartwood: Eric Werner is cooking at Chefs Club (275 Mulberry Street) on June 22 and 23. The Peasant alum and master of open-fire cooking will prepare five Hartwood dishes for an à la carte menu. You can book through Open Table here.

Carretera Tulum Boca Paila

A post shared by Hartwood Tulum (@hartwoodtulum) on

Shoolbred’s is closing

EVGrieve reports that Shoolbred’s at 197 Second Avenue will close on Sunday after nearly ten years in the neighborhood because the rent’s too high. “It is appropriate that we should be closing on Father’s Day weekend,” co-owner Robert Morgan told the blog, “Shoolbred’s was designed as ‘Your Father’s Bar, while your father is away on business.'” Morgan also runs Kingston Hall on Second Avenue and Baci e Vendetta on Avenue A with Nic Ratner.

A Bronx Tale’s Chazz Palminteri moves his restaurant

The man who wrote and performed the Broadway show — now playing at the Longacre Theatre — also has a namesake restaurant that he’s moving from Second Avenue to 30 West 46th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues at the Cambria Hotel later this month. The restaurant has resided at its current location since 2015.

It’s herring season, don’t you know?

Grand Central Oyster Bar kicked off its Holland Herring Festival that runs through June 30, with an event earlier this week with the higher-ups from the Netherlands Consulate. The delicacy arrives air-expressed from Scheveningen, The Netherlands, on the North Sea where herring is caught. For the next two weeks, they’ll be served with hard-boiled egg, sweet onion, and chives, priced starting at $7.

Mark your calendar: Rosé soiree at Roberta’s

Next Sunday there’s a rosé soiree on Sunday, June 25 from noon to 6 p.m. Wine guy Hugh Crickmore will feature over thirty natural, organic, and biodynamic rosés from producers from around the world. And because no rose party is complete without a pig roast, there will be pork — along with pizzas available from the take-out bakery.

What does it take to raise a perfect oyster?

Find out here:

6 great places in Atlanta to take dad on Father’s Day for food and fun

Take dad to a Gwinnett Braves game and dine at Niekros ./Photo credit: Hyosub Shin

Anyone can take dear old Dad out for a steak or a stogie on his big day, but if you’re looking to go beyond the norm, check out these spots that offer up both food and fun on Father’s Day weekend (and beyond).

If Dad is a car nut, try: The Porsche Experience Center

What you’ll do: Rev your engines on the facility’s test track and choose from a variety of driving modules including an off-road circuit and a low-friction circle. Want a little extra attention? Porsche offers one-on-one training with their driving consultants.

What you’ll eat: Restaurant 365, located on the second floor of the Porsche Experience Center, offers a seasonal fine-dining menu thtat includes appetizers, soups, salads and entrees including lamb loin, sea scallops and wiener schnitzel. If you’re planning on eating, though, you’ll have to move the Father’s Day celebrations to Saturday — the restaurant is closed on Sundays.

Porsche Experience Center and Restaurant 365, One Porsche Drive, Atlanta. 888-204-7474. porschedriving.com/centers/Atlanta.

6 great places in Atlanta to take dad on Father’s Day for food and fun

Race around in go-karts and grab a bite at The Andretti Grill this Father’s Day./ Photo credit: Curtis Compton.

If Dad likes go-karting and games, try: Andretti Indoor Karting & Games

What you’ll do: Get your heart pumping with high-speed indoor go-karts, a 7-D ride, a cosmic rock climbing wall and a multitude of video games.

What you’ll eat: The Andretti Grill features appetizers, salads, burgers, pizza and smoked options from the Big Green Egg, as well as desserts and a variety of alcoholic beverages.

Andretti Indoor Kartin & Games, 11000 Alpharetta Highway, Roswell. 770-992-5688, andrettikarting.com/roswell/ and 1255 Roswell Road, Marietta. 678-496-9530. andrettikarting.com/marietta.

6 great places in Atlanta to take dad on Father’s Day for food and fun

Eat at the 57th Fighter Group Restaurant and get a view of one of the vintage aircrafts on the grounds of the restaurant, and of airplanes on the runways of DeKalb-Peachtree Airport./Photo credit: Charlotte B. Teagle.

If Dad’s into planes, try: 57th Fighter Group Restaurant

What you’ll do: If Dad missed his calling as a fighter pilot — or just likes planes — he’ll be able to watch planes land and take off at the edge of the Atlanta DeKalb-Peachtree Airport. The restaurant’s aviation-themed memorabilia will make him feel like he’s in the pilot’s seat.

What you’ll eat: On Sunday, choose from a brunch buffet from 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. or dinner from 5-9 p.m. Dinner items include crawfish etouffe, pork tenderloin and a variety of appetizers, soups and salads.

57th Fighter Group Restaurant, 3829 Clairmont Road, Atlanta. 770-234-0057. www.the57threstaurant.com.

 If Dad likes golf, try: Top Golf

What you’ll do: Hone your golf skills — or lack thereof — with golf “games” that ask you to hit targets with balls. Also select games that test your accuracy, short game and more and get some TLC with individual and group classes. If you want to get an early start this weekend, Top Golf open at 8 a.m. on Father’s Day.

What you’ll eat: Top Golf’s upscale pub menu offers a variety of appetizers, salads, sandwiches, burgers, sliders and desserts, as well as beers, wines and craft cocktails.

Top Golf, 1600 Ellsworth Industrial Blvd. NW, Atlanta. 404-475-4000. topgolf.com/us/atlanta and 10900 Westside Parkway, Alpharetta. 770217-0513. topgolf.com/us/alpharetta/.

6 great places in Atlanta to take dad on Father’s Day for food and fun

Take Dad to play Dragon Soccer at Novo Cucina. / Handout photo.

If Dad likes soccer, try: Novo Cucina

What you’ll do: The restaurant recently installed a turfed Dragon Goal soccer field. Popular in Europe, the small-sided field will let Dad focus on his technical skills before or after dinner.

What you’ll eat: Novo Cucina, from the team behind Sotto Sotto and Fritti, offers up an Italian menu that includes a variety of pizzas, salads and pastas, as well as homemade gelato.

Novo Cucina, 5592 Chamblee Dunwoody Road. Dunwoody. 470-275-3000. novocucina.com.

Catch a baseball game and dine at Niekros ./Photo credit: Hyosub Shin.

If Dad likes baseball, try: Coolray Field

What you’ll do: The Gwinnett Braves are playing out of town this weekend, so you’ll have to postpone Father’s Day until Monday, but watching the minor league team play should be worth it.

What you’ll eat: There are your typical baseball concessions options, plus a restaurant, Niekros (named for pitcher Phil Niekro) that offers burgers, sandwiches and the Knucksie, a pulled pork/cole slaw sandwich served on cornbread.

6 great places in Atlanta to take dad on Father’s Day for food and fun

Uptown’s Newest Hot Pot Stands Up Against Any Chinese Restaurant in Town

Four stars for 108 Food Dried Hot Pot

Broadway from 100th to 116th Streets in Upper Manhattan may be poised to become a hotbed of northern Chinese and Korean eats. It started with a series of carts parked by the Columbia University entrance gates, vending spicy noodles, pork-filled dumplings, bao sandwiches, and kimchee-laden stews to students and faculty who demanded modern East Asian fare, but couldn’t find it elsewhere in the area. Gradually, brick-and-mortar establishments have appeared in the blocks south of the campus, in a neighborhood sandwiched between the Upper West Side and Morningside Heights.

One example was Lava Kitchen at 101st and Broadway, a brightly lit spot specializing in dumplings, bing, garlicky vegetable appetizers, and noodle bowls with a range of hotness — and, believe me, the hottest was really, really hot. The latest newcomer is 108 Food Dried Hot Pot, a boxy corner storefront at 108th Street that had been an Irish bar. It offers the city’s latest Chinese food fad: the dry hot pot, a craze renowned for its spiciness that began in Beijing and first appeared here in Flushing food courts.

Uptown's Newest Hot Pot Stands Up Against Any Chinese Restaurant in Town

Dry hot pot is different than regular hot pot in that a standard hot pot involves cooking at the table by swishing morsels of food in a bubbling broth. Dry hot pot uses many of the same raw materials, but they’re cooked in the kitchen as opposed to at the table. This hot pot is not a soup but a stir-fry and the finished product glistens with oil, not “dry” in the least. The communal enjoyment on the part of the diners and a similar roster of ingredients is what unites the two types of hot pot.

Here’s how it works at 108: You step up to a lavish display of raw ingredients deposited in metal tubs at the rear of the restaurant. An attendant with a sense of humor, her baseball cap turned askew, will assemble the ingredients you point to, putting the meat, poultry, and fish in one metal bowl ($10.99 per pound), and the vegetable matter in another ($9.99 per pound).

Uptown's Newest Hot Pot Stands Up Against Any Chinese Restaurant in Town

She brings these to a weigh station by the register and you are then asked to specify a level of hotness: non-spicy, spicy, medium spicy, or very spicy. (The heat comes from a combo of chili oil, dried chiles, and Sichuan peppercorns.) The ingredients are whisked away, stir-fried with scallions and ginger, only to reappear cooked, at which point your number is called, and you pick up the order. Hopefully, you will find a table in the interim if you didn’t snag one already, and your friends will be sitting there, chopsticks at the ready.

Picking ingredients from the 48 tubs is somewhat bewildering: Will you try pig ear, fish balls, gluten, seaweed knots, or chicken gizzards? Certainly, napa cabbage, squid, rice cake, bok choy, and shrimp are go-tos for some. I’d avoid the thin-shaved beef, which looks good raw but completely falls apart when cooked. A pink and salty Spam-like ham was a surprise favorite and so were the baby sausages. Fish proves superb and enoki mushrooms get too soggy, while the wadded tofu skin retains its texture. Ultimately, pick what looks good: three or four ingredients for each person sharing the hot pot.

One rice bowl is furnished for each diner. If you can keep your hot pot ordering on the meager side, there’s a whole other menu available that’s printed on paper, not posted, and lists mainly Sichuan and Cantonese fare, as if 108 Food were secretly a neighborhood Chinese carryout. If the apps seems more expensive than you might expect, know that the servings are humongous. The northern Chinese standard of cracked cucumbers ($9.95) with garlic sauce is improved with peanuts and cilantro and is like a species of heroin.

Uptown's Newest Hot Pot Stands Up Against Any Chinese Restaurant in Town

Ox intestine and sliced beef ($12.95) and spicy beef tendon — the connective tissue in the cow’s ankle — arrive in razor-thin slices for easy mastication and both dishes slide down the throat on a wave of chile oil. There are also plenty of large-format entrées in a Sichuan/Northern Chinese vein. Though hot and spicy shrimp ($18.99) is the most expensive item on the paper menu, it’s well worth the cost. Enjoy old-fashioned Cantonese? Pork and egg chow mein provides a heap of well-slicked, flavorsome noodles with a fried egg on top.

In fact, I’d put the food quality at 108 Food up against that of any Chinese restaurant in town at a similar price. And its location is a boon, because not only is it more convenient than Flushing for Columbia students and professors, but for many others as well.

All-you-can-eat boneless wings Wednesdays at Applebee’s for $10.99

All-you-can-eat boneless wings Wednesdays at Applebee’s for $10.99./ Photo credit: Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill & Bar.

Wing it.

Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill & Bar is offering all-you-can-eat boneless wings Wednesdays in June for $10.99. Guests can choose from four flavors—honey barbecue, spice sweet Asian chile, classic buffalo and hot buffalo. In case you’re wondering how much of a deal this really is (wink), a regular order of boneless wings is usually $10.49, so for 50-cents more, you’re getting as much as you want. This offer is valid at participating locations while supplies last. Dine-in only; one per offer per person and not valid with other promotions or discounts.

Various locations, applebees.com.

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All-you-can-eat boneless wings Wednesdays at Applebee’s for $10.99

Prosciutto-Wrapped Stuffed Figs

Gorgonzola cheesePhotograph by Raftermen Prosciutto-Wrapped Stuffed Figs Makes 24 12 fresh brown turkey figs, halved ½ pound Gorgonzola cheese 12 slices prosciutto, each halved lengthwise ½ cup balsamic vinegar 1 tablespoon brown sugar Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. In a small saucepan, bring balsamic vinegar and sugar to a slow simmer over medium heat. Cook 20 minutes or until reduced by two-thirds. Cover large rimmed baking sheet with foil. Press a marble-sized nugget of Gorgonzola into the cut side of each fig half and then wrap with a piece of prosciutto; place on prepared sheet. Bake for 4-5 minutes, then drizzle with balsamic reduction and serve immediately. Recipe provided by Sun in My BellyView Original Post

The Canteen food hall opens today in Midtown

Micro food hall The Canteen is located at 75 Fifth Street at Tech Square in Midtown. / Photo: Dave Coustan

Today marks the opening of another Atlanta food hall.

The Canteen is a micro food hall located at 75 Fifth Street NW at Tech Square in Midtown. Highly anticipated since its announcement last summer, The Canteen is the latest venture from business partners Todd Ginsberg, Shelley Sweet, and Jennifer and Ben Johnson – the team behind The General Muir and other Atlanta restaurant concepts.

Housed in the space formerly occupied by the now-shuttered Spence, The Canteen holds outposts of Fred’s Meat & Bread and Yalla, both of which also have locations in Krog Street Market, as well as General Muir bakery spinoff TGM Bagel and new concept Square Bar.

The Canteen food hall opens today in Midtown

The Canteen includes four concepts: TGM Bagel, Square Bar and outposts of Fred’s Meat & Bread and Yalla. / Photo: Ben Johnson

TGM Bagel serves bagels and other breakfast items along with coffee, while Square Bar offers juices and smoothies in the morning and transitions to a full bar featuring beer, wine, and other alcoholic beverages later in the day.

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Read more stories like this by liking Atlanta Restaurant Scene on Facebook, following@ATLDiningNews on Twitter and @ajcdining on Instagram.

The Canteen food hall opens today in Midtown

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